Food as medicine

 

[Image description- blue and white plate with spaghetti and homemade meatballs with a side of zucchni] 

After months of debilitating pain and frantic searches for meds of all sort, I have decided to do myself a solid and change my diet completely. I will be cutting out processed foods, sugars, carbs. My body is literally screaming for help at the top of it’s lungs and if I didn’t listen to it… not only would I be making myself miserable, I would have nobody to blame but myself for my own misery and pain.


After a lot of time in the IC Support group online, it seems that the people who have the most success in remission are people who drastically overhaul their diets. And use food as medicine. Approaching food as medicine and looking at the body in a holistic way makes sense for people with a chronic illness, like IC. 

After a lot of time in the IC Support group online, it seems that the people who have the most success in remission are people who drastically overhaul their diets. And use food as medicine. Approaching food as medicine and looking at the body in a holistic way makes sense for people with a chronic illness, like IC. Very soon I will be drastically overhauling my diet; cutting out carbs, sugar and processed foods. I never thought I would get to this point. I never thought I could or would. But I never thought I would give up orange juice or spaghetti sauce but I did because of my IC. And the pain continues. So the question becomes…what wouldn’t I do to make it stop? Maybe those foods don’t harm me, but I suspect they do. And yes they are delicious, but is it worth the pain they cause? Some people think so.

I understand that we have backward values here in America. We worship the carb, comfort food, and the fast meal. But we are killing ourselves, our children and future generations as painfully as possible by doing this. Chronic conditions are cropping up in droves among 20-30 somethings. Is it a coincidence? It could be. But it’s unlikely. We are products of the DNA we carry, what happens to us in the womb and of our generation. All of these factors are starting to add up and create chronic illnesses en masse where there was once none.

And it really doesn’t help that the medical community looks at us as body parts.

It has often been my experience with doctors, that they want to focus on the part of you that hurts. Where is the injury? IC is in the bladder; therefore we treat the bladder. But hey, here’s a crazy thought, I am more than my bladder. I could just be a giant bladder with long red hair… sometimes I definitely feel like that but in reality, I am a whole person. And IC needs to be treated that way, holistically.

Here’s a prime example of the medical community looking at me and just seeing a giant walking talking bladder. When I was first diagnosed with IC, I immediately began researching food to eat. I found that celery is extremely beneficial to people with IC so I made it a habit it to put it into my food every single day. So what can this celery do exactly? It can lower inflammation, reduces uric acid in the urinary tract (which is good to prevent UTIs and good for the burning while peeing that IC warrior’s experience). 

So… Celery! Who knew? Not my doctor, that’s who. I went to her bi-monthly in the beginning and I went to see her and told her this information. And she told me she never heard that before. I was flabbergasted. I realize that the medical community doesn’t care to look at the body as a whole and doesn’t teach food as medicine, but in all her years as a urologist working with IC patients…nobody ever told her that? or she never went a did a little extra research on her own??
When you, or a loved one, have IC, Migraines or other chronic illnesses, it is so important to do the research. Doctors serve a role and they do the job to the best of their ability. IC is a systemic issue that needs to be looked at and treated holistically. 

 

Image result for celery joke
[Image description: Celery is 95% water and 100%, not pizza. Below the wording is a logo from NBC that says The More you know floating on a shooting star]

 

 

Advertisements

Having a support system

 

[Image description: from left to right: Becca, Rachel, Aaron and Shelby standing next to each other and smiling]
A strong support system is crucial for people with chronic illness to survive and thrive. A support system can include family, friends, support group, doctors, other medical or holistic professionals. My support system is coming together nicely. 

 

The players:

Rachel – The One with IC and more

Debbie – The Mother

Aaron – The Boyfriend

Becca – The Thoughtful One

Shelby – The Cautious Optimist

Christine – The No Funny Business-er

Blinken – The Fluffy Cat

Stanley – The Ninja Cat

Marzipan – The Biggest Little Baby Cat

Ziggy – The Not-So-Nice Cat

Now that we have met the players and their roles. It’s important to understand how all of them will work on a macro and micro level. I know my relationship with each of these people as individuals so on a micro level it’s easy. But on a macro level, the system as a whole should work together fluidly. 

It’s important to find people who you trust, will be there to support you, have your best interest in mind and can be part of a team effort. This can be a difficult task to find a group of people. And for me, as an introvert, I don’t love the idea of having a group of people discussing my well being. But I need a solid plan and a strong support system. Each person

Each person in the support system plays their own role. One or two of them might be better at emotional support. While one might be better at providing support through actions, like someone who comes to see you once a week and cooks you dinner. They are showing you they care about you by being there for you regularly, even if they might not be the best with emotional support. And that’s okay if you have a strong enough support system then it’s good to have a variety of people who can provide different kinds of support. 

I will be planning a huge lifestyle diet change coming up within the next week or so. On Saturday, January 7th, my support system will have a round table discussion of what my diet will look like so that we are all on the same page. So I can go hang out with Becca and she already knows that I can’t eat tomatoes because of my IC and there’s a good chance I’ll cut out sugar and processed foods and so on. Everyone who is in my life already knowing will make it easier for me to follow through and be held accountable for my actions. 

 

Image result for creating a support system quotes
[Image description: Real friends support you no matter what. If you want to be a tuna fish then it’s my job to encourage you to be the best damn tuna fish that you can be.]